Wildy Logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Book of the Month

Cover of Taylor on Criminal Appeals

Taylor on Criminal Appeals

Edited by: Paul Taylor QC
Price: £240.00

Saggerson on Travel Law and Litigation 7th ed



  


Welcome to Wildys

Watch


A Practitioner's Guide to Probate Disputes 2nd ed



  


Offers for Newly Called Barristers & Students

Special Discounts for Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


Recognition of Belligerency and the Law of Armed Conflict


ISBN13: 9780197507056
Published: June 2020
Publisher: Oxford University Press USA
Country of Publication: USA
Format: Hardback
Price: £71.00



Despatched in 8 to 10 days.

Prior to the progressive development of the law of armed conflict heralded by the 1949 Geneva Conventions—most particularly in relation to the concepts of international and non-international armed conflict—the customary doctrine on recognition of belligerency functioned for almost 200 years as the definitive legal scheme for differentiating internal conflict from "civil wars," in which the law of war as applicable between states applied de jure.

Employing a legal historical approach, this book describes the thematic and practical fundamentals of the doctrine, and analyzes some of the more significant challenges to its application. In doing so, it assesses whether, how, and why the doctrine on recognition of belligerency was considered "fit for purpose," and seeks to inform debate as to its continuity and utility within the modern scheme of the law of armed conflict.

Subjects:
Public International Law
Contents:
Introduction by Professor Michael N. Schmitt
Preface
Chapter I: The Scope and Structure of This Book
Chapter II: The Customary Three Level Scheme Part I - Rebellion and Insurgency
Chapter III: The Customary Three Level Scheme Part II - Belligerency
Chapter IV: The Purposes of Recognition of Belligerency
Chapter V: Some Challenging Issues and Case Studies in Recognition of Belligerency
Chapter VI: What if Recognition of Belligerency Remains Legally Available?
Bibliography